Latkes vs. Potato Pancakes

There’s a holiday rivalry, and I don’t just mean between Chanukah and Hanukkah. Potatoes can really get the blood (and oil) boiling. After an informal poll of Shabbat goers, I can tell you that it’s a pretty even split between latke-lovers and potato pancake preferrers. So, for your Shabbat dinner pleasure, I’ve included recipes for both below the video of my gentle pancake flipping.

Toppings Bar

Before you heat up the oil, I suggest setting up the Toppings Bar. Your guests are going to want to dig in RIGHT AWAY. Suggested toppings: sour cream, applesauce, scallions/chives, cilantro/parsley, dill, lox, hot sauce, pickles, salt and pepper.

(PRO TIP: Make latkes and pancakes beforehand and heat up for ~15-20 minutes (or until firm and crisp again) at 400 degrees F. OR: Do the very traditional Hanukkah hot oil dance as you fry up these beauties right in front of your guests.)

(Turmeric Onion) Potato Pancakes

2 cups of mashed potatoes
1 egg
1/4 flour (I used a white wheat flour)
Vegetable oil for frying

1/2 cup shredded white onion
1/2 TBSP Turmeric
2 minced garlic cloves

For plain potato pancakes, use just the ingredients in the left column. For these bomb turmeric onion potato pancakes (featured in the above gif), use both columns of ingredients.

Mix together all ingredients except for oil.

Heat 1/8 inch of oil in spacious skillet on medium to medium-high. Once hot, add TBSPs of batter to skillet, pressing them into patties with spatula. Be patient. Flip once the edges begin to brown.

(Garlicky) Latkes

2 cups of shredded potatoes
1 egg
1/4 flour (I used a white wheat flour)
Vegetable oil for frying

1/2 cup shredded white onion
4 minced garlic cloves

For latkes, use just the ingredients in the left column. For these delicious garlicky latkes, use both columns of ingredients.

Mix together all ingredients except for oil.

Heat 1/8 inch of oil in spacious skillet on medium to medium-high. Once hot, add TBSPs of batter to skillet, pressing them into patties with spatula. Be patient. Flip once the edges begin to brown.

Al Rosenberg

Al Rosenberg is the director of marketing and communications at OneTable. Al lives on the west side of Chicago, loves food festivals and board games, is a board member at Mishkan, and hosts a monthly Rosh Chodesh Well Circle.

Avatar

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *