Jake Cohen’s Shabbat Dinner Series | L8r S8r

Jake Cohen is a nice Jewish boy who loves food. He studied at the Culinary Institute of America, then worked the line at NYC institutions DANIEL and ABC Kitchen before transitioning out of restaurants and into food media. From recipe testing at Saveur Magazine to becoming Food Editor at TastingTable.com, he’s total Shabbat #goals. And trust us, you’re definitely going to want to follow him on Instagram at @jakecohen.

In this blog series, I’m focusing on 3-course Shabbat meals for 10 people. Follow along on insta at @onetableshabbat for how-tos and tips, then find the full recipes here each week.

LATKES WITH SMOKED SALMON AND CREME FRAICHE

These ain’t your basic potato pancakes. Classic latkes are topped with herb-laced cream and smoked salmon for a party appetizer that will put all others to shame. You can make all the components in advance, then just reheat the latkes on a wire rack-line sheet pan in the oven and assemble.

For the Herbed Cream:
1 cup creme fraiche
1 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons minced dill
2 tablespoons minced chives
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon lemon zest
1 garlic clove, finely grated

For the latkes:
2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and grated
½ yellow onion, grated
⅓ cup matzo meal, plus more as needed
1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 eggs
Vegetable oil, for frying

For assembly:
Latkes
Cream
8 ounces sliced smoked salmon

  1. For the herbed cream: In a medium bowl, whisk all the cream ingredients until smooth.
  2. For the latkes: Transfer the grated potato and onion to a bowl lined with cheesecloth and wring the cloth to squeeze out any liquid. Transfer the squeezed potatoes and onion to a large bowl with the matzo meal, salt and eggs. Toss until incorporated.
  3. Pour the liquid squeezed out from the potatoes into the sink, scraping off any potato starch left at the bottom of the bowl and mixing it into the latke mixture.
  4. Heat ¼ inch of vegetable oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, scoop ⅓ cup balls of the mixture and drop in the pan. Using a spatula, smash the latkes to flatten. Cook, flipping once, until golden, 2 to 3 minutes per side, then transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to drain.
  5. To assemble: Place the latkes on a platter and dollop some of the herbed cream on each. Place a piece of smoked salmon on top of each and serve.

MAPLE ROASTED CARROTS

Carrots have never looked so good. Sweet maple syrup adds a floral notes to these tender carrots, pairing perfectly with creamy goat cheese. While keeping the whole makes for a beautiful presentation, but if you’re strapped for time, feel free to chop up the carrots before roasting to cook in half the time.

Ingredients:
4 pounds rainbow carrots, trimmed and scrubbed
⅓ cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
1 teaspoon cumin seeds, crushed
4 thyme sprigs
2 garlic cloves, minced
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
¼ cup maple syrup
4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
Carrot tops, for garnish

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°. On a sheet pan, toss the carrots with the oil, thyme, garlic, salt and pepper. Roast until golden and almost tender, TK minutes.
  2. Drizzle the carrots with the maple syrup and continue to roast until tender and the syrup has caramelized, 6 to 8 minutes more.
  3. Transfer to a platter and garnish with goat cheese and carrot tops. Drizzle with olive oil, then serve.

HORSERADISH DEVILED EGGS

This is the perfect appetizer for any time of year, but especially during Passover. Combining classic deviled eggs with fresh horseradish creates a zesty play on these seder plate staples. These eggs will the perfect refresher to please your dinner guests in lieu of plain hard-boiled eggs.

Ingredients:
12 eggs
¼ cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoon freshly grated horseradish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

  1. Fill a medium pot halfway with water and prepare an ice bath. Bring the water to a boil and then remove from the heat. Using a slotted spoon, gently place the eggs into the pot of water. Return to the heat and bring to a light boil. Cook for 10 minutes, then, using a slotted spoon, transfer the eggs to the prepared ice bath. Let cool completely, then peel and halve lengthwise.
  2. Carefully scoop the egg yolks into a small bowl and reserve the eggs whites. Over a medium bowl, push the egg yolks through a fine-mesh sieve. Stir in the remaining ingredients until smooth, then transfer to a piping bag fit with a star tip.
  3. Pipe about 1 tablespoon of filling into 20 of the egg white halves, reserving the remaining whites for snacking or another use. Transfer to a platter and serve.

CLASSIC BRAISED BRISKET

Jewish families have strong feelings about brisket. To each their own, but I’m just going to say this is the best brisket you’ll ever have. Mushrooms add an earthy savory quality that you don’t always get. I’m also very team tomato in my brisket, adding acid and a little sweetness to cut through the richness of the brisket. Like most stews, it’s always better the next day, so don’t be afraid to make it a few days in advance.

Ingredients:
One 6-pound beef brisket
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
3 tablespoons vegetable oil or chicken fat
2 yellow onions, roughly chopped
1 pound cremini mushrooms, sliced
4 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
¼ cup tomato paste
1½ cups red wine
6 cups tomato sauce
2 cups chicken stock
12 thyme sprigs, tied with butcher’s twine

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°. Season the brisket liberally with salt and pepper.
    In a large Dutch oven or roasting pan, heat the oil over medium high heat. Add the brisket and cook, turning as needed, until golden brown, 16 to 18 minutes. Transfer to a platter.
  2. To the pot, add the onions and cook, stirring often until lightly golden, TK minutes. Add the mushrooms and garlic and continue to cook until the mushrooms are golden as well.
  3. Stir in the tomato paste and cook until lightly caramelized, 2 minutes. Add the wine to deglaze the pan, then cook until completely evaporated, 3 to 5 minutes.
  4. Pour in the tomato sauce and stock, then return the brisket in the pot. Nestle the thyme bundle in the sauce, then bring to a simmer. Cover the pot and place in the oven. Cook until tender, 3 hours, then remove and let cool completely.
  5. Slice the brisket across the grain, then return to the sauce. Warm over medium heat, adjust seasoning, then serve.

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Jake Cohen

Jake Cohen is a nice Jewish boy who loves food. He studied at the Culinary Institute of America, then worked the line at NYC institutions DANIEL and ABC Kitchen before transitioning out of restaurants and into food media. From recipe testing at Saveur Magazine to becoming Food Editor at TastingTable.com, he’s total Shabbat #goals. And trust us, you’re definitely going to want to follow him on Instagram at @jakecohen.

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